Law Alerts/Updates

ACA reporting deadline extended — but employers should stay focused to avoid penalties

About a month ago, and just months before the reporting deadlines required under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were set to go into effect, the Internal Revenue Service gave us all a late Christmas present and announced that it would extend the deadlines. Under the ACA, health insurers, self-insured employers, government agencies and other providers of minimum…

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DOL: Most workers are employees, not independent contractors

This morning, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a memorandum providing guidance in helping employers to reduce the misclassification of employees as independent contractors. There is no change to any existing law; however, the issuance of this memorandum does emphasize the DOL’s continued focus on misclassification issues involving independent contractors. The Fair Labor Standard…

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DOL proposes dramatic changes to FLSA overtime rules

In March of 2014, President Obama issued a presidential memorandum directing the secretary of labor to “update” and “modernize” the regulations under which the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) manages the Fair Labor Standards Act. Particularly, the president called for updating the executive, administrative and professional exemptions (known to us as the “white collar” exemptions), because, according…

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LABOR LAW ALERT » Labor Board ruling has far-reaching impact on employers and workplace policies

Late last week, the National Labor Relations Board changed the rules on employee use of the employer’s email systems for labor organizing. The Labor Board’s new rule is that employee use of email for union-related communications on nonworking time must “presumptively” be permitted by employers who allow employees access to the employer’s email systems.

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EMPLOYEE BENEFITS LAW ALERT » What the legalization of same‑sex marriage means for Oklahoma employers

On Monday, Oklahoma became one of five additional U.S. states required to allow same-sex couples to marry after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to review lower court decisions that overturned state bans on same-sex marriage. The other four states immediately affected by the decision were Indiana, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. Six other states with similar…

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